Photo: Michael Tan, courtesy of Sled Island

MAKING CONNECTIONS

Although today’s technology connects us more than at any other time in history, some studies show that many people still feel alienated and disconnected—and arts are a catalyst for belonging, well-being and community strength. Artistic expression connects us socially and emotionally to fellow Calgarians and to our city.

Photo: Courtesy of Alberta Theatre Projects

The Circle engenders feelings of belonging

To kick off their 2015-16 season, Alberta Theatre Projects programmed the world premiere of The Circle by Geoffrey Simon Brown. In addition to wanting to launch this important new play, they wanted to spark a discussion about how hard it is for young people in our society to find a place to belong. Knowing young people needed to be part of the conversation, they took measures in every part of the organization to welcome them.

IN 2015:

0
attendees to arts activities in Calgary
0
volunteers for arts-related activities
0
volunteer-hours for non-profit arts organizations

Based on data from organizations funded in part through Calgary Arts Development.

Calgary Folk Music Festival creates a true sense of community through its robust volunteer programs

People volunteer for many reasons, and one of them is certainly to collaborate with others on projects or events that give back to the community. One of the bonus benefits of a volunteer program, such as the one run by the Calgary Folk Festival, is the potential to create a deep sense of community amongst the volunteers themselves.  

Photo: Sebastian Hanlon, courtesy of Calgary Folk Fest

CALGARIANS’ ENGAGEMENT WITH THE ARTS

0
%
of Calgarians believe that arts help bring people together and enable people to connect to each other
0
%
of Calgarians believe that a strong arts and culture scene is key to creating a vibrant, safe and prosperous city
0
%

of Calgarians engage with the arts in some way:

0
%
attend arts events (visiting galleries, attending performances, etc.)
0
%
have a creative or personal practice (photography, sketching, playing music, etc.)
0
%
engage through media (watching TV, downloading music, reading magazines, etc.)*
0
%
donate to a not-for-profit arts or cultural organization
0
%
volunteer for an arts organization or arts event

*These statistics capture events produced by Calgary Arts Development grant investees, and not every arts event that takes place in our city.

**In September 2014, Calgary Arts Development commissioned Stone-Olafson to complete market research with Calgarians about their engagement in arts. The research design was completed by Stone-Olafson in collaboration with Calgary Arts Development. A representative sample of 1,012 Calgarians participated in an online survey, and was balanced to be representative of the general population. Calgary Arts Development published this survey in 2015. It can be found here.

ARTS AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

A study by the National Endowment for the Arts examining the correlation between arts and civic engagement found that American adults who attended art museums, galleries or live performances were far more likely than non-attendees to vote, volunteer or take part in community events.

Performing arts attendees were:

0
x
more likely to volunteer
0
x
more likely to attend community meetings
0
x
more likely to vote

Art gallery and museum attendees were:

0
x
more likely to volunteer
0
x
more likely to attend community meetings
0
x
more likely to vote

Arts-Goers in Their Communities: Patterns of Civic and Social Engagement, National Endowment for the Arts, October 2009.

Photo: Courtesy of Arts Commons

ARTS SNAPSHOT

NEW BLOOD

New Blood was a powerful theatrical production created by the Strathmore High School Dance, Blackfoot and Glee classes. Including live music, dance, theatre, poetry, and visual arts, New Blood featured a multi-age cast of Indigenous and non-Indigenous performers. New Blood was based on the life of Chief Vincent Yellow Old Woman and his experiences as a child in residential school, how he reclaimed his way of life and became chief of his people. The show was an inspired response to Mayor Nenshi’s declaration of 2014 as the year of Reconciliation and his challenge to the citizens of Calgary and surrounding areas to learn more, do more, talk more.

Source: Arts Commons

 

ARTS SNAPSHOT

VIEW FROM THE INSIDE

Emerging research suggests that creative arts therapies and experiences can help to reduce anxiety and increase self-esteem and quality of life. View from the Inside is a puppetry-based arts project exploring the experiences of Calgarians who struggle in different ways with mental wellness. The programs gives participants an opportunity to bring to light their experiences of challenge and resiliency through art making, storytelling, drama and movement, live puppetry performance and media technologies. Participants explored their creativity, problem-solving skills and stories of hope.

Source: http://wppuppet.com/view-from-the-inside/

Courtesy of W.P. Puppet Theatre