Photo: Michael Tan, courtesy of Sled Island

MAKING CONNECTIONS

Although today’s technology connects us more than at any other time in history, some studies show that many people still feel alienated and disconnected—and arts are a catalyst for belonging, well-being, and community strength. Artistic expression connects us socially and emotionally to fellow Calgarians and to our city.

David Munoz, project participant, introduces his interpretive experience of Lougheed House | Photo: Courtesy of Lougheed House

Lougheed House

How do you connect a museum to its community? That’s the question the people who run Lougheed House ask a lot these days, as they try to find the connective threads that tie their museumlocated in a mansion that looks as if it beamed out of some 19th century Jane Austen novelonto 13th Avenue, in the middle of Calgary’s 21st century, highly contemporary, millennial-dominated Beltline neighbourhood.

IN 2017:

0
attendees to arts activities in Calgary
0
volunteers for arts-related activities
0
volunteer-hours for non-profit arts organizations

*These statistics capture events produced by Calgary Arts Development grant investees, and not every arts event that takes place in our city.

Based on data from organizations funded in part through Calgary Arts Development.

Creative Aging Calgary Society

What’s the opposite of a loneliness epidemic? In Calgary, it just might be the Creative Aging Calgary Society. That may not have been the question Gail Hinchliffe asked when she launched the Creative Aging Calgary Society back in 2009, but for hundreds of independent-living Calgary seniors, it’s turning out to be a cheap, fun—and inspiring—answer.

Inaugural pop art session featuring intuitive painting with seniors from Silvera’s Willow Park on the Bow | Photo: Courtesy of Creative Aging Calgary Society

CALGARIANS’ ENGAGEMENT WITH THE ARTS

0
%
of Calgarians believe that arts help bring people together and enable people to connect to each other
0
%
of Calgarians believe that a strong arts and culture scene is key to creating a vibrant, safe and prosperous city
0
%

of Calgarians engage with the arts in some way:

0
%
attend arts events (visiting galleries, attending performances, etc.)
0
%
have a creative or personal practice (photography, sketching, playing music, etc.)
0
%
engage through media (watching TV, downloading music, reading magazines, etc.)*
Arts in Action | CALGARIANS’ ENGAGEMENT WITH THE ARTS
0
%
donate to a not-for-profit arts or cultural organization
0
%
volunteer for an arts organization or arts event

*In September 2016, Calgary Arts Development commissioned Stone-Olafson to complete market research with Calgarians about their engagement in arts. The research design was completed by Stone-Olafson in collaboration with Calgary Arts Development. A representative sample of 1,047 Calgarians participated in an online survey, and was balanced to be representative of the general population. Calgary Arts Development published this survey in 2017. It can be found here.

ARTS AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

A study by the National Endowment for the Arts examining the correlation between arts and civic engagement found that American adults who attended art museums, galleries or live performances were far more likely than non-attendees to vote, volunteer or take part in community events.

Performing arts attendees were:

0
x
more likely to volunteer
0
x
more likely to attend community meetings
0
x
more likely to vote

Art gallery and museum attendees were:

0
x
more likely to volunteer
0
x
more likely to attend community meetings
0
x
more likely to vote

Arts-Goers in Their Communities: Patterns of Civic and Social Engagement, National Endowment for the Arts, October 2009.

CommunityWise’s AGM in May 2018 | Photo: Tet M

SNAPSHOT

COMMUNITYWISE

CommunityWise has long been an exemplar for multi-tenant, inclusive, shared community space for grass-roots and non-profit organizations. It’s a home for many arts groups and arts activities, often happening right alongside those working in other sectors, such as the social, environmental, and community. Since March 2016 they have been spearheading an anti-racism policy framework with an objective of creating greater racial equity in their own organization. Through a consultative process they also developed some tools and resources that they are generously sharing with the community-at-large. Learn more about the Anti-Racist Organizational Change (AROC) Equity Framework.

SNAPSHOT

BUG INCISION

Bug Incision was founded in 2005 by Chris Dadge, David Laing, and Scott Munro, then known collectively as the Bent Spoon Trio. Originally focused on recording projects, in 2006 the group expanded its local presence into presenting concerts that revolve around improv/free jazz/noise, and celebrated their 10-year anniversary in 2016. Past and present venues have included EMMEDIA, Theatre Junction GRAND, National Music Centre, Weeds Cafe, the Soda, and Broken City. Their current season experiments with curating fluctuating combinations of talented instrumentalists for unique, short, improvised performances. The series has become a staple in the community, and is a driving force in bringing artists of different aesthetics, abilities, and communities together while encouraging experimentation and collaboration.

Jack Sinclaire | Photo: Jarrett Edmund